Category Archives: Starting Your Mastermind Group

How to Invite People to Your Mastermind Group

You’re ready to invite your audience to join your mastermind group, or you’ve hand-selected people you want to be in your group.

What do you say to them and how do you approach them?

Be clear about the purpose of your group.

Prospective members will want to know if the purpose of the group matches what they need at this point in their personal and professional lives. Is it a group for professional reasons, or personal? Or both?

Be clear about the benefits.

  • What is a mastermind group?
  • What topics will be covered?
  • What outcomes can people expect?
  • Why do people join a mastermind group?

You need well thought-out and well-written answers to these basic questions, because your prospective members are going to ask. It would be helpful if you had a page on your website that answers these questions, and definitely helpful that you can verbally answer these questions as well.

Be clear about the commitment.

Mastermind groups are not for weenies or the feint of heart, because your group relies upon you showing up and participating. Your group relies upon you being willing to give and take advice. Your group will ask you to grow, which means you have to be ready to take on challenges to achieve the success you want.

Explain to your prospective mastermind group members that they will be asked to commit to the mastermind group and the process.

Be clear about the logistics.

Nothing will scare away prospective group members faster than not having the details.

  • Determine how often you’ll meet, where you’ll meet, and for how long.
  • Describe how the Hot Seats will be constructed.
  • Tell them how many members will be in the group.
  • Explain to them how to register for the group. Make sure they have all the facts.

Invite them.

Now that you’ve gathered all the information to share with a prospective group member, invite people to join your group.

If you have a short list of hand-selected people, call them. Mastermind groups are all about personal relationships, so an email will not suffice as an introduction to a group when you have hand-selected the people you want to invite. It helps to create a bullet-point list of how you want to approach the conversation so that you don’t forget what you want to say.

If you haven’t hand-selected prospective members, an introductory email to your list might be the best place to start.

If it’s a long-term mastermind group with a big commitment (say, a 12-month group), consider meeting your prospect in person, if possible. Discussing your mastermind group over lunch or dinner could be helpful, as it gives each of you time to talk about it and answer any questions.

Then follow-up with an email and a link to your website.

People rarely make the decision to join a mastermind group immediately, and you wouldn’t want them to. You want them to consider the commitment level required before they say “yes.”

While they’re thinking about it, it’s helpful if they have something in writing to use as a reference and a guide. If you have a website, add a page that describes the mastermind group. If you don’t have a website, follow up with an email listing all the pertinent information and benefits.

As you can see, it’s helpful to plan ahead. If you want your mastermind group to start in January, you will need to approach people in November. This means your script and your website need to be updated in October. Plan for at least a three-month marketing cycle to get your marketing materials ready and implement your marketing…that way, you’ll fill your groups!

6 Ways to Find a Mastermind Group

You want to join a mastermind group, but don’t know where to start looking for one, right?

Mastermind groups are everywhere; you just need to know where to find them.

Be sure you know what you’re looking for in a group before trying to find one to join. For instance:

  • Do you want to meet in person? Or is meeting by phone or video chat acceptable?
  • Do you need to meet in the evening, or is a day-time meeting better?
  • What topic areas do you want the group to focus on?
  • Do you want to be held accountable for getting actions done and reporting back to the group, or do you want something more casual?

Here are six tips to get you started:

  1. Start a group of your own. It’s easier than you think, and you can hand-select the people you want to brainstorm with. This way you get to choose the dates, times, locations and topic areas that work best for you. You’re bound to find friends and colleagues who are searching, too.
  2. See if there are any local mastermind groups by checking Meetup.com. You can search within a radius of your zip code to find local mastermind groups on many topics. Then contact the group organizer and find out if the group is still meeting, and if they’re taking new members.
  3. Use my Find a Mastermind Group service, which lists people who have existing mastermind groups and are looking for new members. Read the descriptions to see which group is right for you, then email the facilitator to set up time to talk on the phone about their group.
  4. Talk with colleagues. Ask your connections via email, Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn if they know of any existing groups looking for new members, or any new groups that are forming. Telephone colleagues and friends and let them know you’re looking. Ask coworkers. They might be in a mastermind group right now and would know if the group is a good match for you. Or through their network of friends and colleagues, they can spread the word about what you’re looking for.
  5. Check with your favorite mentors, teachers and writers. They often have mastermind groups, and they don’t always advertise them. If they don’t have groups themselves, they may know of others who do.
  6. Check with  your local professional organizations, including trade groups, chambers of commerce, religious groups, networking groups, and schools. Anywhere that groups of people regularly meet together are the most likely to have mastermind groups.

Look around and you’ll be surprised how many groups there are. Then interview the facilitator and some of the other members of the group to determine if the group is a good match for you. Ask if you can attend one meeting to get a feel for the group and how it’s run.

You’ll love being part of a mastermind group!

Why Mastermind Group Guidelines Matter

When starting and running your own mastermind group, it’s imperative that you and your mastermind members come up with some rules about the purpose of the group and how members are expected to behave. These rules are often compiled into a document called Group Guidelines and each member signs it to show they agree to follow these rules and principles.

Here’s why rules and guidelines matter: initially, your group is getting a feel for each other, connecting (or not connecting) based on personality, goals and communication style.

Then comes the rocky part of any mastermind group (sort of like the “seven year itch” in marriage) where things can fall apart. Group members don’t honor each other’s boundaries, people don’t show up for meetings, and the energy of the group falls flat.

Group Guidelines help the Group Facilitator to bring the group back into alignment. Breaking the discussion pattern for one session and focusing on the group’s goals and purpose helps to solidify a group that’s faltering. It gets people to re-commit to the group process, and gives people who have been looking for an escape from the group the perfect opportunity to leave in a healthy way.

Facilitators can also use the Group Guidelines when speaking with a difficult member, one that the group hopes to retain, but only if he/she modifies their behavior to conform to the Guidelines.

Harmony and respect are the keywords to any successful mastermind group. Written Group Guidelines will help you keep harmony and respect flowing smoothly.